2020 ASALH Virtual Teacher Workshop

Description Prepared by La Vonne I. Neal, Ph.D.

Participants: Alabama School Districts; University Partners; & Community Members
Workshop Theme: The Black History Theme for 2021

THE BLACK FAMILY:
REPRESENTATION, IDENTITY & DIVERSITY

Saturdays
12:30 p.m. EST/11:30 a.m. CST - 2:00 p.m. EST /1:00 p.m. CST (1.5 Hours)

Teacher Session Schedule—Total Hours = 6 Hours

Saturday, September 5, 2020 12:30 p.m. EST/11:30 a.m. CST – 2:00 p.m. EST /1:00 p.m. CST (1.5 Hours)

Saturday, September 12, 2020 12:30 p.m. EST/11:30 a.m. CST – 2:00 p.m. EST /1:00 p.m. CST (1.5 Hours)

Saturday, September 19, 2020 12:30 p.m. EST/11:30 a.m. CST – 2:00 p.m. EST /1:00 p.m. CST (1.5 Hours)

Saturday, September 26, 2020 12:30 p.m. EST/11:30 a.m. CST – 2:00 p.m. EST /1:00 p.m. CST (1.5 Hours)

 

 

Note: This is a six-hour workshop. Each session is different and participation in all sessions is recommended for optimum benefit.

Tuesdays
5:00 p.m. EST/4:00 p.m. CST - 4:50 p.m. EST /5:50 p.m. CST

Student Session Schedule—Total Instruction Hours = 2.5 Hours

Tuesday, August 25, 2020 5:00 p.m. EST/4:00 p.m. CST – 4:50 p.m. EST /5:50 p.m. CST (50 Minutes)

Tuesday, September 1, 2020 5:00 p.m. EST/4:00 p.m. CST – 4:50 p.m. EST /5:50 p.m. CST (50 Minutes)

Tuesday, September 8, 2020 5:00 p.m. EST/4:00 p.m. CST – 4:50 p.m. EST /5:50 p.m. CST (50 Minutes)

Note: The ASALH Virtual After-School Program—“The Carter G. Woodson Scholars Program,” is a research project designed for high school students. Students will learn how to be a “Forensic Historian”— research investigation steps will be assigned as homework. Their research project will be—“Black Family History and Genealogy.” Students’ research projects will be presented to the session facilitators and recorded on Tuesday, September 8, 2020. Facilitators will show samples of students’ presentations to the teachers on Saturday, September 26, 2020. Subsequently, students will be registered as presenters at the 105th Annual Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) Conference. Each student session is different and participation in all sessions is recommended for optimum benefit.

Academic Standards: Standards from the following Alabama documents and the National Council for Social Studies Standards (NCSS) will be utilized during the teacher and student sessions: 1. 2016 Revised Alabama Course of Study: English Language Arts: 

  • Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies (Appendix C) 
  • College & Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing (Appendix C) 2. College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework—NCSS 

Special Features for Teachers, Administrators, Professors, Students, & Community Members: 

This virtual, interactive, and multi-media workshop will be customized for workshop participants from Alabama in accordance with the Alabama State Department of Education (ALSDE) aforementioned documents. The information and materials presented will support the ALSDE Vision—“Every Child a Graduate / Every Graduate Prepared.”  

Workshop Activities: 

Facilitators will conduct two sessions: (1) Session for Teachers, Administrators, Professors, and Community Members, and (2) Session for high school Students. 

Workshop Theme: The Black History Theme for 2021: 

“The Black Family: Representation, Identity & Diversity” 

Teacher Session Content: 

Facilitators will conduct the interactive, multi-media workshop using lesson snapshots / demonstrations to teach and model culturally responsive teaching methods. Teachers will learn: 

  • How to link dimensions of African American culture and “Culturally Responsive” 

teaching methods to social studies standards; 

  • How to teach history online using the tenets of “Culturally Responsive Teaching” and 

ASALH Resources (BHB Lesson Plans, Posters, Books, etc.); 

  • How to differentiate instruction for children with special needs and children who are 

culturally and/or linguistically diverse; 

  • How to incorporate technology standards; and 
  • How to incorporate literacy standards. 

Student Session Content: 

Students will be participating in an ASALH Virtual After-School Program—“The Carter G. Woodson Scholars Program.” Students will learn how to be a “Forensic Historian.” Their research project will be—“Black Family History and Genealogy. Facilitators will conduct the workshop using “Culturally Responsive Teaching” methods. 

Students will learn how to: 

  1. Gather and chart family information in the form of genealogical facts; 2. Conduct oral history interviews with relatives or friends; 3. Take notes and collect copies of family history documents, photographs, and artifacts; 4. Treat any of these sources as primary and secondary sources and interpret their validity 

compared to general historical context; and 5. Research the historical context of some of the family history they are gathering. 

Alabama Standard: Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects (Appendix C)—Grades 11-12 

  • Research to Build and Present Knowledge—Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem: narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. 

Hyper Link for the National Council for Social Studies (NCSS) Standards: 

  • NCSS College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies 

https://www.socialstudies.org/sites/default/files/c3/C3-Framework-for-Social-Studies.pdf