Vanguard: How Black Women Broke Barriers, Won the Vote, and Insisted on Equality for All

Thursday, September 3, 2020
2:30 p.m. - 3:20 p.m. EST

In the standard story, the suffrage crusade began in Seneca Falls in 1848 and ended with the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920. But this overwhelmingly white women’s movement did not win the vote for most black women. Securing their rights required a movement of their own.

Martha S. Jones

Johns Hopkins University

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Brittney Cooper

Rutgers University

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Tanisha Ford

The Graduate Center, CUNY

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Sharon Harley

University of Maryland, College Park

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One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression is Destroying Our Democracy

Thursday, September 10, 2020
12:30 p.m. - 1:20 p.m. EST

This book roundtable will discuss One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression is Destroying Our Democracy, perhaps the most timely and insightful election-era book of our time. In One Person, No Vote, historian and New York Times best-selling author Carol Anderson follows the astonishing story of government-dictated racial discrimination unfolding before our very eyes as more and more states adopt voter suppression laws.

Carol Anderson

Emory University

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Brett Gadsden

Northwestern University

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Fredrick Harris

Columbia University

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Leah Wright Rigueur

Harvard University

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Duty beyond the Battlefield: African American Soldiers Fight for Racial Uplift, Citizenship, and Manhood, 1870–1920

Thursday, September 17, 2020
12:30 p.m. - 1:20 p.m. EST

In a bold departure from previous scholarship, Le’Trice D. Donaldson locates the often overlooked era between the Civil War and the end of World War I as the beginning of black soldiers’ involvement in the long struggle for civil rights. Donaldson traces the evolution of these soldiers as they used their military service to challenge white notions of an African American second-class citizenry and forged a new identity as freedom fighters willing to demand the rights of full citizenship and manhood.  

Duty beyond the Battlefield demonstrates that from the 1870s to 1920s military race men laid the foundation for the “New Negro” movement and the rise of Black Nationalism that influenced the future leaders of the twentieth century Civil Rights movement.

Le’Trice Donaldson

University of Wisconsin-Stout

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Hilary Green

The University of Alabama

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Andre E. Johnson

University of Memphis

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George White Jr.

York College, CUNY

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The Great Migration and the Democratic Party

Saturday, September 19, 2020
1:30 p.m. - 2:20 p.m. EST

Where Black people live has long been an important determinant of their ability to participate in political processes. The Great Migration significantly changed the way Democratic Party elites interacted with Black communities in northern cities, Detroit, New York, and Chicago. Many white Democratic politicians came to believe the growing pool of Black voters could help them reach their electoral goals—and these politicians often changed their campaign strategies and positions to secure Black support. Furthermore, Black migrants were able to participate in politics because there were fewer barriers to Black political participations outside the South.

The Great Migration and the Democratic Party frames the Great Migration as an important economic and social event that also had serious political consequences. 

Keneshia Grant

Howard University

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Blair L.M. Kelley

North Carolina State University

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Melanye Price

Prairie View A&M University

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Saladin Ambar

Rutgers University

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The Sword and the Shield: The Revolutionary Lives of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr.

Thursday, September 24, 2020
2:30 p.m. - 3:20 p.m. EST

To most Americans, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. represent contrasting ideals: self-defense vs. nonviolence, black power vs. civil rights, the sword vs. the shield. The struggle for black freedom is wrought with the same contrasts. While nonviolent direct action is remembered as an unassailable part of American democracy, the movement’s militancy is either vilified or erased outright. In The Sword and the Shield, Peniel E. Joseph upends these misconceptions and reveals a nuanced portrait of two men who, despite markedly different backgrounds, inspired and pushed each other throughout their adult lives. This is a strikingly revisionist biography, not only of Malcolm and Martin, but also of the movement and era they came to define.

Peniel Joseph

University of Texas at Austin

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Pero Dagbovie

Michigan State University

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Shirletta Kinchen

University of Louisville

Yohuru Williams

University of St. Thomas

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John Hervey Wheeler, Black Banking and the Economic Struggle for Civil Rights

Saturday, September 26, 2020
12:30 p.m. - 1:20 p.m. EST

John Hervey Wheeler (1908–1978) was one of the civil rights movement’s most influential leaders. In articulating a bold vision of regional prosperity grounded in full citizenship and economic power for African Americans, this banker, lawyer, and visionary would play a key role in the fight for racial and economic equality throughout North Carolina.

Brandon Winford

University of Tennessee

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Charles W. McKinney, Jr.

Rhodes College

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Shennette Garrett-Scott

University of Mississippi

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Pero Dagbovie

Michigan State University

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