Black History Month Festival Opening

Online via Zoom

The opening session will describe the month-long celebration of the 2022 Black History theme, Black Health and Wellness, and will invite viewers to join with ASALH in acknowledging the legacy of Black scholars and medical practitioners in Western medicine, and other ways of knowing throughout the African Diaspora.

Author’s Book Talk Event: A Good Ending for Bad Memories

Online via Zoom

In the 1860s, Lloyd Earl was an African American entrepreneur disguised as an enslaved carpenter who traveled nationwide with freedom papers forged by his own hand. Collector of the “comebacks,” Lloyd Earl built the first Negro Kitchen Library in the USA. His family and others like it were found on a list called The Curiously Successful Negro. A list kept in secret for more than 100 years by Harvard University!

ASALH Book Prize

Online via Zoom

The Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) awards an annual prize to recognize an outstanding book in the field of African American history and culture.

Author’s Book Talk Event: 8 Pearls of Wisdom

Online via Zoom

Author Kimberly A. Morrow is on a mission to empower parents to become better advocates for their children. Parents often are confronted with issues of not knowing essential study skills for children, technology, preparing their child for college and tackling their child's learning deficiency and more.

Author’s Book Talk Event: Black is the Journey, Africana the Name

Online via Zoom

In this highly original book, Maboula Soumahoro explores the cultural and political vastness of the Black Atlantic, where Africa, Europe, and the Americas were tied together by the brutal realities of the slave trade and colonialism.

Author’s Book Talk Event: To Care for the Sick and Bury the Dead: African American Lodges and Cemeteries in Tennessee

Online via Zoom

Benevolent Orders, the Sons of Ham, Prince Hall Freemasons—these and other African American lodges created a social safety net for members across Tennessee. During their heyday between 1865 and 1930, these groups provided members with numerous resources, such as sick benefits and assurance of a proper burial, opportunities for socialization and leadership, and the chance to work with local churches and schools to create better communities. Many of these groups gradually faded from existence, but their legacy endures in the form of the cemeteries the lodges left behind.