2022 ASALH BOOK PRIZE

The ASALH Book Prize for the best new book in African American history and culture

The Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) awards an annual prize to recognize an outstanding book in the field of African American history and culture.

The winner of the ASALH Book Prize was announced on February 17, during ASALH’s 2022 Black History Month Virtual Festival. Additionally, the winning author will be featured in a virtual book roundtable hosted by ASALH-TV in April 2022.

Selection Committee: co-chairs Gerald Horne (Professor, University of Houston) and Ula Taylor (Professor, UC Berkeley), and jurors Elizabeth Todd-Breland (Assoc. Professor, University of Illinois-Chicago), Christopher Tinson (Assoc. Professor, St. Louis University), and Kellie Carter-Jackson (Assoc. Professor, Wellesley College).

WINNER

WINNER: Jarvis R. Givens, Fugitive Pedagogy: Carter G. Woodson and the Art of Black Teaching, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2021

FINALISTS

Tamika Y. Nunley, At the Threshold of Liberty: Women, Slavery, and Shifting Identities in Washington, D.C., Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2021

Keith Wailoo, Pushing Cool: Big Tobacco, Racial Marketing, and the Untold Story of the Menthol Cigarette, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2021

Erica R. Edwards, The Other Side of Terror: Black Women and the Culture of US Empire, New York: New York University Press, 2021

Destin Jenkins, The Bonds of Inequality: Debt and the Making of the American City, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2021

V. P. Franklin, The Young Crusaders: The Untold Story of the Children and Teenagers Who Galvanized the Civil Rights Movement, Boston: Beacon Press, 2021

K. Stephen Prince, The Ballad of Robert Charles: Searching for the New Orleans Riot of 1900, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2021

Elizabeth Hinton, America on Fire: The Untold History of Police Violence and Black Rebellion Since the 1960’s, New York: Liveright, 2021