THURSDAY LUNCHEON, OCTOBER 3, 2019

Thursday, October 3, 2019
12 noon - 1:45 p.m.


Embassy Suites by Hilton in North Charleston, SC.
Ballroom A – Convention Center – 1st floor
5055 International Blvd, North Charleston, SC 29418 | (843) 747-1882

Speaker: Jonathan Green, Ambassador of the Arts
The Legacy of the Lowcountry Rice Culture

Jonathan Green – 1955 – Noted art critics and reviewers consider Jonathan Green one of the most important painters of the southern experience. His work, which has been exhibited in major venues nationally and internationally, reflects an intrinsic sense of history and place.

FRIDAY LUNCHEON, OCTOBER 4, 2019

Bible Study (The Story of the Mother Emanuel AME Massacre in Charleston, SC)

 

Councilman William Dudley Gregorie, Moderator 

Lost a family member, Susie J. Jackson

 

Rev. Eric S.C. Manning, Panelist

Pastor, Mother Emanuel AMEC

 

Polly Sheppard, Panelist  

One of the adult survivors

 

Rev. Dr. Brenda Nelson, Panelist

Ministerial Staff 2015-2019,
lost a best friend, Rev. DePayne Middleton-Doctor

 

Mr. Melvin Graham, Panelist

Brother of Cynthia Graham Hurd

 

CARTER G. WOODSON LUNCHEON

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2019
12 noon - 1:45 p.m.

Embassy Suites by Hilton in North Charleston, SC.
Ballroom A – Convention Center – 1st floor
5055 International Blvd, North Charleston, SC 29418 | (843) 747-1882

Speaker: Pero G. Dagbovie, The Journal of African American History (JAAH) Editor

Pero Gaglo Dagbovie is University Distinguished Professor of History and Associate Dean in the Graduate School.  His research and teaching interests comprise a range time periods, themes, and topical specialties, including black intellectual history, the history of the black historical enterprise, black women’s history, black life during “the nadir,” the civil rights-Black Power movement, African American Studies, hip hop culture, and contemporary black history. His books include Black History: “Old School” Black Historians and the Hip Hop Generation (Bedford Publishers, Inc., 2006), The Early Black History Movement, Carter G. Woodson, and Lorenzo Johnston Greene (University of Illinois Press, 2007), African American History Reconsidered (University of Illinois Press, 2010), Carter G. Woodson in Washington, D.C.:  The Father of Black History (The History Press, 2014), What is African American History? (Polity Press: Cambridge, UK,  2015), and Reclaiming the Black Past:  The Use and Misuse of African American History in the Twenty-First Century (Verso Books, 2018).  He is the next Editor of The Journal of African American History.

SATURDAY ASALH AWARDS BANQUET

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2019
7:30 p.p. – 10:30 p.m.


Embassy Suites by Hilton in North Charleston, SC.
Ballroom A – Convention Center – 1st floor
5055 International Blvd, North Charleston, SC 29418 | (843) 747-1882

Speaker: Rev. Nelson B. Rivers III, Luminary Award recipient

Music: Oscar Rivers Quartet

 
 
 
 

 

SUNDAY ECUMENICAL BREAKFAST

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2019
8:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.


Embassy Suites by Hilton in North Charleston, SC.
Ballroom C1/C2 – Convention Center – 1st floor
5055 International Blvd, North Charleston, SC 29418 | (843) 747-1882

Speaker, Reverend Dr. Norvel Goff Sr.
Presiding Elder, Edisto District

Reverend Dr. Norvel Goff Sr. was appointed Presiding Elder of the Edisto District of the South Carolina Annual Conference by the Right Reverend Richard Franklin Norris, Presiding Prelate of the 7th Episcopal District of the African Methodist Episcopal Church on November 14, 2014. After the recent tragedy at Mother Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, SC, Bishop Norris assigned him as interim Pastor where he provide leadership and pastoral oversight through the congregation’s healing process. As a result of his leadership, Governor Niki Haley awarded him the Order of the Palmetto, the highest civilian honor in the state of South Carolina. Prior to his appointment as Presiding Elder, Reverend Goff served as the Pastor of Reid Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Columbia, South Carolina for ten (10) years. During his tenure as pastor of Reid Chapel, 700 individuals became members and the financial stewardship of the church increased by over 250%, which allowed the church to eliminate its church and school mortgages within the first two years of his tenure.